Monday, July 18, 2022

Tomas Doherty

Dublin has provisionally recorded its hottest day on record, according to Met Éireann.

The temperature reached 33 degrees Celsius in Phoenix Park on Monday afternoon, 12.8 degrees above average for the weather station at this time of year.

Once verified, the temperature would be Ireland’s 2nd highest on record and the hottest in 135 years. The reading is only 0.3 degrees below the all-time record – 33.3 degrees at Kilkenny Castle on June 26th, 1887.

Other stations which have recorded provisional highest-ever temperatures are Dunsany, Co Meath at 30.2 degrees and Mullingar, Co Westmeath at 30.4 degrees. 

The extreme heat comes amid a nationwide warning for “exceptionally warm weather” until 7pm on Tuesday.

Nighttime temperatures are forecast to range between 15 and 20 degrees, making a tropical night – when temperatures do not dip below 20 degrees – likely.

Europe is currently experiencing one of the hottest and driest summers on record, with widespread wildfires, excess deaths and water shortages reported in Spain, France and Portugal. The UK has issued its first ever red warning for exceptional heat as temperatures could reach 40 degrees in some places on Tuesday.

Keith Lambkin, head of Met Éireann’s climate services division, said climate change is increasing the odds of record-breaking temperatures.

“Due to climate change, we are expecting to see heatwaves become longer, more frequent and intense than in the past. This increase in heat increases the odds of temperature records being broken,” he said.

Met Éireann said Tuesday will continue to be very warm over the eastern half of the country, with highest temperatures of 22-26 or 27 degrees. It will be cooler and fresher elsewhere though with highs of 16-22 degrees.

The day will bring a mix of cloud and hazy sunshine with some showery rain – with an isolated thundery burst possible.

 

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